Posted by Andrew Hill on Wed, Nov 16, 2016 @ 03:28 PM

Why driver training won’t improve work related road risk (WRRR).

Why driver training won’t improve work related road risk (WRRR). Here’s what will..jpg

Driver training is a key part of fleet management. It has long been suggested as a means of addressing issues such as driver safety on the road and more fuel-efficient driving skills, which can impact on fleet management costs.

However, with the introduction of Work Related Road Risk (WRRR), can we really expect driver training to help reduce issues on the road—or are we missing the real problem?

The importance of WRRR

WRRR is an approach instigated by Transport for London (TfL). It requires companies with goods vehicles delivering to, collecting from, or servicing TfL projects to be compliant with certain restrictions. This might be achieving Bronze accreditation status under the Fleet Operator Recognition Scheme (FORS), or undertaking additional driver training relating to cyclists and other vulnerable road users.

Any company working with TfL in this capacity must ensure both its own and sub-contractor vehicles and drivers meet WRRR standards, or else face a breach of contract which could impact site access.

Why driver training might not be the issue

Some in the industry have told us they don’t believe driver training to be the issue. Drivers will work hard in training and often pass with flying colours, but this doesn’t necessarily mitigate future problems. This is because driver training and real-life driving situations are different entities entirely. We all act differently during training. We’re focused on the tasks at hand and aware that we’re being tested. Yet in the real world we get distracted and even complacent with our routine.

Many drivers see their vehicles as ‘their cab’ as opposed to their work vehicle. It’s their home away from home, and such comfort in their surroundings may see this driving complacency creep in. For example, a lorry driver recently pleaded guilty to the tragic killing of a mother and three children on the A34, when his vehicle collided with their car because he was distracted changing the music on his mobile phone.

What else can be done to improve WRRR?

Incidents such as this one cannot necessarily be prevented by driver training. So, in addition to this training, what else can we turn to in our efforts to increase road safety?

A change in company culture can certainly help. As Dr Lisa Dorn, Associate Professor of Driver Behaviour at Cranfield University, states in Utility Fleet Magazine:

“Driver behaviour at work is affected by the company’s policies, practices, and unwritten procedures which may impact on driving performance in unexpected ways.”

This means that—as well as training—those in charge of fleet management need to create the appropriate working environment and culture to encourage driver safety compliance. The right structure, processes, roles and systems should be in place so that employees feel encouraged to share responsibility in delivering fleet safety, instead of feeling that it is at odds with commercial pressures. 

As well as this overall approach, there are other aspects of fleet management that, when implemented, could help align with WRRR—such as in-vehicle technology. For example, the improvements in telematics could mean that gamification could play its part, where recorded driver behaviour statistics allow drivers to compete against each other on company leaderboards for rewards.

Changes such as these could not only help improve safety across the fleet, but would also boost driver and employee morale, improving retention and saving money in new hires.

To learn more about the importance of fleet safety and the key responsibilities in achieving safer driving, download our easy-to-read guide: guide to improving fleet compliance.

Why business compliance should be a top business priority

Trigger guide

This is an inline guide purely for the editor, it will not show in the final blog, designed the assist you with setting the options below in the 'Gate Trigger' section.

You will not be able to use the WYSIWYG editor for this it's code only so follow these instructions carefully.


Button
We cannot use a standard call to action to open the rest of the content, but we do want to track when someone clicks on the button to read the rest of the blog. Here's what the code should look like:
<a class="gate-trigger-button" href="#" id="Why driver training won’t improve work related road risk (WRRR). - Read the rest of the post" title="Read the rest of the post">Read the rest of the post</a>


Survey
Instead of using a button, you can ask people a what their intent of being on the blog is. Here's an example.
<h3 style="text-align:center;">Ready to read the post?</h3>
<p style="text-align:center;">Great, just let us know why you're here today</p>
<ul id="survey">
<li><a href="#" id="Why driver training won’t improve work related road risk (WRRR).">Answer One</a></li>
<li><a href="#" id="Why driver training won’t improve work related road risk (WRRR).">Answer Two</a></li>
<li><a href="#" id="Why driver training won’t improve work related road risk (WRRR).">Answer Three</a></li>
<li><a href="#" id="Why driver training won’t improve work related road risk (WRRR).">Answer Four</a></li>
<li><a href="#" id="Why driver training won’t improve work related road risk (WRRR).">Answer Five</a></li>
<li><a href="#" id="Why driver training won’t improve work related road risk (WRRR).">Other</a></li>
</ul>

If you want to connect what the user selects in the survey with the call to action at the bottom, use the following:
<ul id="cta-list">
<li><a href="#">CTA One</a></li>
<li><a href="#">CTA Two</a></li>
<li><a href="#">CTA Three</a></li>
<li><a href="#">CTA Four</a></li>
<li><a href="#">CTA Five</a></li>
<li><a href="#">Default</a></li>
</ul>


Form
We need to add the same form for each blog, you can if you want to make your own form but you'll need to change the formId which will be in the URL for the form e.g. https://app.hubspot.com/forms/234700/648983ff-6a25-4353-9301-08f793edfcb5/edit:
<script charset="utf-8" type="text/javascript" src="//js.hsforms.net/forms/v2.js"></script>
<script>
hbspt.forms.create({
portalId: '234700',
formId: '648983ff-6a25-4353-9301-08f793edfcb5',
css: '',
onFormSubmit: function($form) {
gateTriggerForm('Why driver training won’t improve work related road risk (WRRR).');
}
});
</script>


CTA Form
If people are clicking the CTA but then not filling in the form on the landing page they're being taken to, it may be worth loading the form on the same page to see if that helps the submission rate:
<div class="cta-form-image">
<a class="cta-form-image-button" href="#" id="CTA Click - Why driver training won’t improve work related road risk (WRRR)."><img alt="Title of the CTA" src="https://cdn2.hubspot.net/hubfs/234700/FER_CTAs/download-your-free-guide-lcv-acquisition-hire-or-buy.png" title="Title of the CTA"></a>
</div>
<div class="cta-form-inputs">
<a href="#" class="cta-form-inputs-close"><i class="fa fa-times" aria-hidden="true"></i></a>
<script charset="utf-8" type="text/javascript" src="//js.hsforms.net/forms/v2.js"></script>
<script>
hbspt.forms.create({
portalId: '234700',
formId: '648983ff-6a25-4353-9301-08f793edfcb5',
css: '',
onFormSubmit: function($form) {
gateTriggerCTAForm('Why driver training won’t improve work related road risk (WRRR).');
}
});
</script>
</div>

This is the rest of the blog

When the page loads, or when it is being edited, this content will appear. When the page is loaded on the blog, the content will be hidden by the script until such times the trigger button is clicked or the trigger form is completed.

If you're not using this section then you should delete the text in here.

Topics: Fleet compliance

Comments